Late Holocene changes in shellfishing behaviors from the Gulf of Carpentaria, Northern Australia

Rosendahl, Daniel, Ulm, Sean, Tomkins, Helene, Wallis, Lynley and Memmott, Paul (2014) Late Holocene changes in shellfishing behaviors from the Gulf of Carpentaria, Northern Australia. Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology, 9 2: 253-267. doi:10.1080/15564894.2014.880757


Author Rosendahl, Daniel
Ulm, Sean
Tomkins, Helene
Wallis, Lynley
Memmott, Paul
Title Late Holocene changes in shellfishing behaviors from the Gulf of Carpentaria, Northern Australia
Journal name Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1556-1828
1556-4894
Publication date 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/15564894.2014.880757
Open Access Status
Volume 9
Issue 2
Start page 253
End page 267
Total pages 15
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Dramatic changes in shellfishing behaviors occur across northern Australia during the late Holocene, marked most conspicuously by the cessation of large shell mound construction in some areas, and the reorganization of shellfishing behaviors towards more intensive production in the last 1,000 years. Excavations reveal rapid and widespread changes within coastal sites, an increasing diversification in overall subsistence resources, and patterns of increase in site establishment and use. Some of these changes have been argued to be associated with increasing climate variability and a trend towards increasing aridity during the late Holocene, thought to have transformed coastal ecosystems and mollusc availability. However, when these hypotheses are tested at the local level, more nuanced patterns of human-environment interaction emerge, which call into question interpretations based on broad-scale climate records. We suggest that disjunctions in the timing of the cessation of shell mound construction noted between the west and east Gulf of Carpentaria may be related, at least in part, to the timing and intensity of external cultural contacts with Macassan seafarers, associated with reorganization of mobility and production strategies, rather than as yet undemonstrated environmental changes impacting on shellfish availability. © 2014 Copyright
Keyword Gulf of Carpentaria
Shell mounds
Shellfishing
Wellesley Islands
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 05 Aug 2014, 02:43:50 EST by System User on behalf of School of Architecture