Egg size effects across multiple life-history stages in the marine annelid Hydroides diramphus

Allen, Richard M. and Marshall, Dustin (2014) Egg size effects across multiple life-history stages in the marine annelid Hydroides diramphus. PLoS One, 9 7: e102253.1-e102253.9. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0102253

Author Allen, Richard M.
Marshall, Dustin
Title Egg size effects across multiple life-history stages in the marine annelid Hydroides diramphus
Journal name PLoS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2014-07-18
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0102253
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 9
Issue 7
Start page e102253.1
End page e102253.9
Total pages 9
Place of publication San Francisco, CA United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract The optimal balance of reproductive effort between offspring size and number depends on the fitness of offspring size in a particular environment. The variable environments offspring experience, both among and within life-history stages, are likely to alter the offspring size/fitness relationship and favor different offspring sizes. Hence, the many environments experienced throughout complex life-histories present mothers with a significant challenge to optimally allocate their reproductive effort. In a marine annelid, we tested the relationship between egg size and performance across multiple life-history stages, including: fertilization, larval development, and post-metamorphosis survival and size in the field. We found evidence of conflicting effects of egg size on performance: larger eggs had higher fertilization under sperm-limited conditions, were slightly faster to develop pre-feeding, and were larger post-metamorphosis; however, smaller eggs had higher fertilization when sperm was abundant, and faster planktonic development; and egg size did not affect post-metamorphic survival. The results indicate that egg size effects are conflicting in H. diramphus depending on the environments within and among life-history stages. We suggest that offspring size in this species may be a compromise between the overall costs and benefits of egg sizes in each stage and that performance in any one stage is not maximized.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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