Health behaviors, prostate cancer, and masculinities: a life course perspective

Oliffe, John (2009) Health behaviors, prostate cancer, and masculinities: a life course perspective. Men and Masculinities, 11 3: 346-366. doi:10.1177/1097184X06298777


Author Oliffe, John
Title Health behaviors, prostate cancer, and masculinities: a life course perspective
Journal name Men and Masculinities   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1097-184X
1552-6828
Publication date 2009-04-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1097184X06298777
Volume 11
Issue 3
Start page 346
End page 366
Total pages 21
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher Sage
Language eng
Abstract Epidemiological data indicate that men are overrepresented in mortality rates attributed to both natural causes (e.g., ischemic heart disease) and certain deaths caused by external causes (e.g., motor vehicle accidents). Men's health behaviors are consistently linked to their poor health outcomes, and diverse explanations about what underpins men's health behaviors have been presented by commentators and researchers alike. Recently connections between men's behaviors and dominant ideals of masculinity have provided empirical snapshots about the intersections of gender and health and specific illness events. This study uses a retrospective life course method to describe the connections between health behaviors and masculinity across time among three Anglo-Australian men who were born in the 1920s and 1930s and grew up in Victoria, Australia. The findings from this study illustrate how health behaviors intersect with shifting social constructions of masculinity and are mediated by factors including age, history, social class, culture, and illness.
Keyword Life course
Masculinities
Men's health behaviors
Prostate cancer
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 35 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 39 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 05 Aug 2014, 00:21:16 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work