Do co-residence and intentions make a difference? Relationship satisfaction in married, cohabiting, and living apart together couples in four countries

Tai, Tsui-o, Baxter, Janeen and Hewitt, Belinda (2014) Do co-residence and intentions make a difference? Relationship satisfaction in married, cohabiting, and living apart together couples in four countries. Demographic Research, 31 1: 71-104. doi:10.4054/DemRes.2014.31.3


Author Tai, Tsui-o
Baxter, Janeen
Hewitt, Belinda
Title Do co-residence and intentions make a difference? Relationship satisfaction in married, cohabiting, and living apart together couples in four countries
Journal name Demographic Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1435-9871
Publication date 2014-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.4054/DemRes.2014.31.3
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 31
Issue 1
Start page 71
End page 104
Total pages 34
Place of publication Rostock, Germany
Publisher Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: A large body of research has compared relationship satisfaction and quality in cohabiting versus married relationships. Despite increased recognition of couples in living apart together (LAT) relationships, very little research has examined the experiences of couples in LAT relationships compared to co-residential unions.

Objective: Our aim is to develop knowledge about the experiences of different union types by investigating relationship satisfaction of people in LAT, cohabiting, and marital relationships. We differentiate those with intentions to marry for cohabiters, and those with intentions to marry or live together in LAT relationships. We also examine differences by gender and country.

Methods: Using data from Wave 1 of the Generations and Gender Survey in France, Germany, Australia, and Russia (n = 9,604), OLS regressions are estimated to investigate a) differences in relationship satisfaction across relationship types, and b) across countries.

Results: Married people have the highest levels of relationship satisfaction. People in non-marital unions with intentions to marry or live together are significantly more satisfied than those without marriage or cohabitation intentions. Those in LAT relationships with no intentions to live together have the lowest levels of relationship satisfaction. There is evidence of cross-national variation with differences in relationship satisfaction by union type most pronounced in Australia and Russia. Gender differences are found with women reporting lower levels of relationship satisfaction than men.
Keyword Gender-Role Attitudes
Relationship Quality
Marital Quality
United-States
Premarital Cohabitation
European Countries
Commitment
Family
Housework
Union
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
Official 2015 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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