An evaluation of the effectiveness of a hospital pharmacist initiated smoking cessation intervention (SCI) in combination with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in a tertiary hospital

Gupta, Deepali (2014). An evaluation of the effectiveness of a hospital pharmacist initiated smoking cessation intervention (SCI) in combination with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in a tertiary hospital Master's Thesis, School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Deepali_Gupta_Final_Version.pdf Thesis full-text application/pdf 3.89MB 9
Author Gupta, Deepali
Thesis Title An evaluation of the effectiveness of a hospital pharmacist initiated smoking cessation intervention (SCI) in combination with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in a tertiary hospital
School, Centre or Institute School of Pharmacy
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2014-07-30
Thesis type Master's Thesis
Supervisor Judith Burrows
John Upham
Karl Winckel
Total pages 129
Total colour pages 22
Total black and white pages 107
Language eng
Subjects 111503 Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice
Formatted abstract
Background: Hospital pharmacists currently play a limited role in the management
of nicotine withdrawal and smoking cessation. Little is known about the hospital
pharmacist’s impact on initiating smoking cessation interventions.
Aim: The aims of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of hospital pharmacist
initiated smoking cessation intervention (SCI) in increasing the utilisation of Nicotine
Replacement Therapy (NRT) in hospitalised smokers, and in increasing quit rates
post discharge.
Method: This study was conducted in a tertiary referral hospital using the pragmatic
randomised control design. After screening, 100 inpatient smokers were enrolled and
randomised to either the intervention or usual care arm (n=50 for both arms).
Smoking-cessation advice was available to all smokers during their hospital stay
under the smoking management policy, which represented usual care. Those in the
intervention arm received brief SCI from the research pharmacist and were offered
NRT if required. The research pharmacist also facilitated prescription of NRT on
discharge. Prescribing rates of NRT in the hospital and on discharge in both the
groups was compared. Participants were contacted by phone 3 months after
enrolment to assess their 7 day point prevalence of abstinence (PPA) from smoking
and use of NRT post discharge.
Results: A significantly higher proportion (68% vs.12%) of participants in the
intervention arm received NRT on discharge (p<0.001, OR 15.6) and significantly
more participants who received smoking-cessation advice from the hospital
pharmacist continued to use NRT after discharge (OR 3.1). A similar number of
participants in both the groups claimed 7-day PPA after 3-months (18% usual-care vs
15% intervention-arm, p=0.77, OR 0.8).
Conclusions: This study demonstrated that pharmacist led brief SCI can enhance
the utilisation of NRT in hospital and after discharge. Exploring feasible options for a
coordinated, multidisciplinary approach to smoking cessation in hospital and across
the continuum may have a greater impact on long term smoking cessation rates.
Keyword Smoking cessation intervention
Nicotine replacement therapy

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 30 Jul 2014, 11:43:13 EST by Vanessa Lee King on behalf of School of Pharmacy