False grandparents, fear of fear and Viennese topography: a translation of Ilse Aichinger's Kleist, Moos, Fasane and Die grobere Hoffnung

Fedunik-Hofman, Larissa (2014). False grandparents, fear of fear and Viennese topography: a translation of Ilse Aichinger's Kleist, Moos, Fasane and Die grobere Hoffnung Honours Thesis, School of Languages and Comparative Cultural Studies, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Fedunik-Hofman, Larissa
Thesis Title False grandparents, fear of fear and Viennese topography: a translation of Ilse Aichinger's Kleist, Moos, Fasane and Die grobere Hoffnung
Formatted title
False grandparents, fear of fear and Viennese topography: a translation of Ilse Aichinger’s Kleist, Moos, Fasane and Die größere Hoffnung
School, Centre or Institute School of Languages and Comparative Cultural Studies
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2014
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Geoff Wilkes
Total pages 70
Language eng
Subjects 2005 Literary Studies
Abstract/Summary This thesis presents a translation of some of the short texts in Ilse Aichinger’s publication Kleist, Moos, Fasane, as well as a translation of a chapter of Aichinger’s novel Die gröβere Hoffnung. Both texts explore fear, isolation and racial and political persecution under the Third Reich primarily from a childhood perspective. The semi-autobiographical texts in Kleist, Moos, Fasane refer to Vienna before, during and after the Nazi Occupation, while Die gröβere Hoffnung describes the repressive Nazi regime from the perspective of a group of Jewish children. While Die gröβere Hoffnung is clearly a novel, it too draws on Aichinger’s own experiences. The translation strategies have been shaped by the characterisation of the ‘notional reader’, a characterisation extrapolated from the texts themselves. To maintain historical specificity, the source texts have not been domesticated by deleting source-culture references or replacing them with target-culture specific ones. Translation challenges such as the translation of culturally embedded words and phrases have been managed by the insertion of explanatory phrases. Aichinger’s differing styles in the two texts have been replicated by including explicit Nazi-era or Holocaust references in Kleist, Moos, Fasane, and avoiding these explicit references in Die gröβere Hoffnung. Repeated motifs in the source texts have been translated consistently into English, while the slight obscurity of some non-recurring motifs has been retained, and Aichinger’s plays on words have been translated using English equivalents. Finally, less text-specific issues inherent in German to English translation have been addressed: gendered pronouns have been explicated to avoid ambiguities and strategies have been employed to preserve distinctions between the formal, informal and plural modes of address in German.

 
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Created: Mon, 28 Jul 2014, 08:56:45 EST by Ms Katrina Hume on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures