The association between resting heart rate, cardiovascular disease and mortality: Evidence from 112,680 men and women in 12 cohorts

Woodward, Mark, Webster, Ruth, Murakami, Yoshitaka, Barzi, Federica, Lam, Tai-Hing, Fang, Xianghua, Suh, Il, Batty, G David, Huxley, Rachel and Rodgers, Anthony (2014) The association between resting heart rate, cardiovascular disease and mortality: Evidence from 112,680 men and women in 12 cohorts. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, 21 6: 719-726. doi:10.1177/2047487312452501


Author Woodward, Mark
Webster, Ruth
Murakami, Yoshitaka
Barzi, Federica
Lam, Tai-Hing
Fang, Xianghua
Suh, Il
Batty, G David
Huxley, Rachel
Rodgers, Anthony
Title The association between resting heart rate, cardiovascular disease and mortality: Evidence from 112,680 men and women in 12 cohorts
Journal name European Journal of Preventive Cardiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2047-4881
2047-4873
Publication date 2014-06
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/2047487312452501
Open Access Status
Volume 21
Issue 6
Start page 719
End page 726
Total pages 8
Place of publication London United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications Inc
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background:
Multiple studies have examined the relationship between heart rate and mortality; however, there are discrepancies in results. Our aim was to describe the relationship between resting heart rate (RHR) and both major cardiovascular (CV) outcomes, as well as all-cause mortality in the Asia-Pacific region.

Design and methods:
Individual data from 112,680 subjects in 12 cohort studies were pooled and analysed using Cox models, stratified by study and sex, and adjusted for age and systolic blood pressure.

Results:
During a mean 7.4 years follow-up, 6086 deaths and 2726 fatal or nonfatal CVevents were recorded. There was a continuous, increasing association between having a RHR above approximately 65 beats/min and the risk of both CV and all-cause mortality, yet there was no evidence of associations below this threshold. The hazard ratio (95% CI) comparing the extreme quarters of RHR (80 v <65 beats/min) was 1.44 (1.291.60) for CV and 1.54 (1.431.66) for total mortality. These associations were not materially changed by adjustment for other risk factors and exclusion of the first 2 years of follow-up. Hazard ratios of a similar magnitude were found for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, but the hazard ratio for heart failure was higher (2.08, 95% CI 1.074.06) and for Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) was lower (1.11, 95% CI 0.931.31) than for stroke.

Conclusions:
RHR of above 65 beats/min has a strong independent effect on premature mortality and stroke, but a lesser effect on CHD. Lifestyle and pharmaceutical regimens to reduce RHR may be beneficial for people with moderate to high levels of RHR.
Keyword Asia
Australia
Cardiovascular disease
Coronary heart disease
Heart failure
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Public Health Publications
 
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