Efficiency of lexical access in children with autism spectrum disorders: does modality matter?

Harper-Hill, Keely, Copland, David and Arnott, Wendy (2014) Efficiency of lexical access in children with autism spectrum disorders: does modality matter?. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44 8: 1819-1832. doi:10.1007/s10803-014-2055-4


Author Harper-Hill, Keely
Copland, David
Arnott, Wendy
Title Efficiency of lexical access in children with autism spectrum disorders: does modality matter?
Journal name Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0162-3257
1573-3432
Publication date 2014-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10803-014-2055-4
Open Access Status
Volume 44
Issue 8
Start page 1819
End page 1832
Total pages 14
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer New York
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The provision of visual support to individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is widely recommended. We explored one mechanism underlying the use of visual supports: efficiency of language processing. Two groups of children, one with and one without an ASD, participated. The groups had comparable oral and written language skills and nonverbal cognitive abilities. In two semantic priming experiments, prime modality and prime–target relatedness were manipulated. Response time and accuracy of lexical decisions on the spoken word targets were measured. In the first uni-modal experiment, both groups demonstrated significant priming effects. In the second experiment which was cross-modal, no effect for relatedness or group was found. This result is considered in the light of the attentional capacity required for access to the lexicon via written stimuli within the developing semantic system. These preliminary findings are also considered with respect to the use of visual support for children with ASD.
Keyword Children
Language
Semantic priming
Retrospective semantic matching
Attention
Visual support
Autism spectrum disorders
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2015 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 25 Jul 2014, 10:28:04 EST by Dr Wendy Arnott on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research