The world is her oyster: negotiating contemporary white womanhood in Hollywood's tourist spaces

Marston, Kendra (2016) The world is her oyster: negotiating contemporary white womanhood in Hollywood's tourist spaces. Cinema Journal, 55 4: 3-27. doi:10.1353/cj.2016.0045


Author Marston, Kendra
Title The world is her oyster: negotiating contemporary white womanhood in Hollywood's tourist spaces
Journal name Cinema Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0009-7101
1527-2087
Publication date 2016
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1353/cj.2016.0045
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 55
Issue 4
Start page 3
End page 27
Total pages 25
Place of publication Austin, TX, United States
Publisher Journals Division, University of Texas Press
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This article analyzes a recent variation of the contemporary Hollywood travel romance that sees middle-aged female protagonists involved in the creative industries suffer a form of urban melancholy caused by years of adherence to neoliberal feminism. The films employ the trope of the creatively gifted melancholic in order to allow the heroines to “rediscover” feminism through fantasized constructions of foreign countries built by the mobilization of projected affect. These gendered narratives must be read for their racial implications, given that they present affl uent white women as the ultimate bearers of burden in contemporary US society, and they must also be analyzed as offering a commentary on the extradiegetic global image of the United States. 
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Communication and Arts Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 22 Jul 2014, 09:45:12 EST by Ms Stormy Wehi on behalf of School of Communication and Arts