Inclusion of 'minor' trauma cases provides a better estimate of the total burden of injury: Queensland Trauma Registry provides a unique perspective

Lang, Jacelle, Dallow, Natalie, Lang, Austin, Tetsworth, Kevin, Harvey, Kathy, Pollard, Cliff and Bellamy, Nicholas (2014) Inclusion of 'minor' trauma cases provides a better estimate of the total burden of injury: Queensland Trauma Registry provides a unique perspective. Injury, 45 8: 1236-1241. doi:10.1016/j.injury.2014.03.023

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ335113OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 197.45KB 30

Author Lang, Jacelle
Dallow, Natalie
Lang, Austin
Tetsworth, Kevin
Harvey, Kathy
Pollard, Cliff
Bellamy, Nicholas
Title Inclusion of 'minor' trauma cases provides a better estimate of the total burden of injury: Queensland Trauma Registry provides a unique perspective
Journal name Injury   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1879-0267
0020-1383
Publication date 2014-08
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.injury.2014.03.023
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 45
Issue 8
Start page 1236
End page 1241
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Introduction

Injury is recognised as a frequent cause of preventable mortality and morbidity; however, incidence estimates focusing only on the extent of mortality and major trauma may seriously underestimate the magnitude of the total injury burden. There currently exists a paucity of information regarding minor trauma, and the aim of this study was to increase awareness of the contribution of minor trauma cases to the total burden of injury.

Methods

The demographics, injury details, acute care factors and outcomes of both minor trauma cases and major trauma cases were evaluated using data from the state-wide trauma registry in Queensland, Australia, from 2005 to 2010. The impact of changes in Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) versions on the classification of minor and major injury cases was also assessed.

Results

Over the 6-year period, minor cases [Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≤ 12] accounted for almost 90% of all trauma included on the Queensland Trauma Registry (QTR). These cases utilised more than half a million acute care bed days, underwent more than 66,500 operations, and accounted for more than 48,000 patient transport episodes via road ambulance, fixed wing aircraft, or helicopter. Furthermore, more than 5800 minor trauma cases utilised in-hospital rehabilitation services; almost 3000 were admitted to an ICU; and more than 20,000 were admitted to hospital for greater than one week. When using the contemporary criteria for classifying trauma (AIS 08), the proportion of cases classified as minor trauma (87.7%) and major trauma (12.3%) were similar to the proportion using the traditional criteria for AIS90 (87.9% and 12.1%, respectively).

Conclusions

This evaluation of minor trauma cases admitted to public hospitals in Queensland detected high levels of demand placed on trauma system resources in terms of acute care bed days, operations, ICU admissions, in-hospital rehabilitation services and patient transportation, and which are all associated with high cost. These data convincingly demonstrate the significant burden of injury imposed by minor trauma cases serious enough to be admitted to hospital.
Keyword Minor injury
Burden of injury
Public health impact
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 22 Jul 2014, 02:53:10 EST by System User on behalf of National Research on Disability and Rehabilitation Medicine