A functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene is associated with neural responses to induced anger control

Denson, Thomas F., Dobson-Stone, Carol, Ronay, Richard, von Hippel, William and Schira, Mark M. (2014) A functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene is associated with neural responses to induced anger control. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 26 7: 1418-1427. doi:10.1162/jocn_a_00592

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Author Denson, Thomas F.
Dobson-Stone, Carol
Ronay, Richard
von Hippel, William
Schira, Mark M.
Title A functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene is associated with neural responses to induced anger control
Formatted title
 A functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene is associated with neural responses to induced anger control
Journal name Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1530-8898
0898-929X
Publication date 2014-07
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1162/jocn_a_00592
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 26
Issue 7
Start page 1418
End page 1427
Total pages 10
Place of publication Cambridge, MA, United States
Publisher M I T Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aggressiveness is highly heritable. Recent experimental work has linked individual differences in a functional polymorphism of the monoamine oxidase-A gene (MAOA) to anger-driven aggression. Other work has implicated the dorsal ACC (dACC) in cognitive-emotional control and the amygdala in emotional arousal. The present imaging genetics study investigated dACC and amygdala reactivity to induced anger control as a function of MAOA genotype. A research assistant asked 38 healthy male undergraduates to control their anger in response to an insult by a rude experimenter. Men with the low-expression allele showed increased dACC and amygdala activation after the insult, but men with the high-expression allele did not. Both dACC and amygdala activation independently mediated the relationship between MAOA genotype and self-reported anger control. Moreover, following the insult, men with the high-functioning allele showed functional decoupling between the amygdala and dACC, but men with the low-functioning allele did not. These results suggest that heightened dACC and amygdala activation and their connectivity are neuroaffective mechanisms underlying anger control in participants with the low-functioning allele of the MAOA gene.
Keyword MAOA gene
Induced anger control
Aggressiveness
Amygdala
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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