Successful recruitment to a study of first-episode psychosis by clinicians: a qualitative account of outcomes and influences on process

Patterson, Sue, Duhig, Michael, Connell, Melissa and Scott, James (2014) Successful recruitment to a study of first-episode psychosis by clinicians: a qualitative account of outcomes and influences on process. Journal of Mental Health, 23 5: 225-230. doi:10.3109/09638237.2014.924051


Author Patterson, Sue
Duhig, Michael
Connell, Melissa
Scott, James
Title Successful recruitment to a study of first-episode psychosis by clinicians: a qualitative account of outcomes and influences on process
Journal name Journal of Mental Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0963-8237
1360-0567
Publication date 2014-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3109/09638237.2014.924051
Open Access Status
Volume 23
Issue 5
Start page 225
End page 230
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Strategies proposed to promote recruitment of representative samples to trials and mental health research have focused on researchers external to clinical services. How clinicians approach recruitment as researchers and particularities of recruiting people with first episode of psychosis warrant investigation.

Aims: To describe recruitment, by clinicians, of people with first-episode psychosis (FEP) and factors influencing process and enrolment.

Methods: Observational study nested within longitudinal examination of trauma and outcomes for patients experiencing first psychotic episode. Data collected during 20 scheduled meetings of clinicians recruiting from services in Australia.

Results: Timely recruitment of 60 young people demonstrates that clinicians can successfully engage patients in research. Success depends on satisfaction of organisational preconditions and clinician motivation grounded in considering the study worthwhile. Pre-selection of participants was informed by judgments about health, insight and quality of the therapeutic alliance. Patients’ decisions were influenced by family support, acceptance of diagnosis and altruism. Honoraria had variable effect.

Conclusions: Clinicians are well placed to recruit when appropriately supported, and people with FEP are willing to engage in research that fits their personal circumstances. Research should examine the meaning of participation in such studies and ways participation could support recovery.
Keyword Clinicians
First-episode psychosis
Qualitative
Recruitment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 17 Jul 2014, 14:41:31 EST by James Scott on behalf of Psychiatry - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital