Effect of an episode of critical illness on subsequent hospitalisation: a linked data study

Williams, T. A., Knuiman, M. W., Finn, J. C., Ho, K. M., Dobb, G. J. and Webb, S. A. R. (2010) Effect of an episode of critical illness on subsequent hospitalisation: a linked data study. Anaesthesia, 65 2: 172-177. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2044.2009.06206.x


Author Williams, T. A.
Knuiman, M. W.
Finn, J. C.
Ho, K. M.
Dobb, G. J.
Webb, S. A. R.
Title Effect of an episode of critical illness on subsequent hospitalisation: a linked data study
Journal name Anaesthesia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-2409
1365-2044
Publication date 2010-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2044.2009.06206.x
Open Access Status
Volume 65
Issue 2
Start page 172
End page 177
Total pages 6
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Abstract Healthcare utilisation can affect quality of life and is important in assessing the cost-effectiveness of medical interventions. A clinical database was linked to two Australian state administrative databases to assess the difference in incidence of healthcare utilisation of 19 921 patients who survived their first episode of critical illness. The number of hospital admissions and days of hospitalisation per patient-year was respectively 150% and 220% greater after than before an episode of critical illness (assessed over the same time period). This was the case regardless of age or type of surgery (i.e. cardiac vs non-cardiac). After adjusting for the ageing effect of the cohort as a whole, there was still an unexplained two to four-fold increase in hospital admissions per patient-year after an episode of critical illness. We conclude that an episode of critical illness is a robust predictor of subsequent healthcare utilisation.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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