Clinically important improvements in motor function are achievable during inpatient rehabilitation by stroke patients with severe motor disability: a prospective observational study

Hayward, Kathryn S., Kuys, Suzanne S., Barker, Ruth N. and Brauer, Sandra G. (2014) Clinically important improvements in motor function are achievable during inpatient rehabilitation by stroke patients with severe motor disability: a prospective observational study. NeuroRehabilitation, 34 4: 773-779. doi:10.3233/NRE-141076


Author Hayward, Kathryn S.
Kuys, Suzanne S.
Barker, Ruth N.
Brauer, Sandra G.
Title Clinically important improvements in motor function are achievable during inpatient rehabilitation by stroke patients with severe motor disability: a prospective observational study
Journal name NeuroRehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1878-6448
1053-8135
Publication date 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3233/NRE-141076
Open Access Status
Volume 34
Issue 4
Start page 773
End page 779
Total pages 7
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher IOS Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
BACKGROUND: A good motor outcome after stroke is often equated with independence in functional performance. However, for patients with severe motor disability a good outcome is unlikely, but an important change may be achievable. OBJECTIVE: Determine if patients admitted to inpatient rehabilitation with severe motor disability can achieve clinically important improvements in motor function. METHODS: A prospective observational study of 239 patients with stroke admitted to inpatient rehabilitation in Brisbane, Australia was conducted. On admission and discharge, participants were assessed using the motor items of the Functional Independence Measure (m-FIM). The importance of change achieved on the m-FIM was evaluated according to: 1) a statistical significant outcome; 2) achievement of a MCID based on a physician-anchored rating of change; and 3) shift in disability status e.g., severe to moderate disability. RESULTS: Patients with severe motor disability achieved a significant improvement in motor function (p < 0.001), which saw up to 83% achieve a MCID and 85% shift out of ‘severe’ to either moderate or mild motor disability on discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that patients admitted to inpatient rehabilitation with severe motor disability can achieve clinically important improvements in motor function on discharge from inpatient rehabilitation.
Keyword Stroke
Inpatient rehabilitation
Functional recovery
Severe
Motor
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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