Evaluating the impact of air pollution on the incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the Perth Metropolitan Region: 2000–2010

Straney, Lahn, Finn, Judith, Dennekamp, Martine, Bremner, Alexandra, Tonkin, Andrew and Jacobs, Ian (2014) Evaluating the impact of air pollution on the incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the Perth Metropolitan Region: 2000–2010. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 68 1: 6-12. doi:10.1136/jech-2013-202955


Author Straney, Lahn
Finn, Judith
Dennekamp, Martine
Bremner, Alexandra
Tonkin, Andrew
Jacobs, Ian
Title Evaluating the impact of air pollution on the incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the Perth Metropolitan Region: 2000–2010
Journal name Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0143-005X
0141-7681
Publication date 2014-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/jech-2013-202955
Open Access Status
Volume 68
Issue 1
Start page 6
End page 12
Total pages 7
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher B M J Group
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains a major public health issue. Several studies have found that an increased level of ambient particulate matter (PM) smaller than 2.5 microns (PM2.5) is associated with an increased risk of OHCA. We investigated the relationship between air pollution levels and the incidence of OHCA in Perth, Western Australia.

Methods: We linked St John Ambulance OHCA data of presumed cardiac aetiology with Perth air pollution data from seven monitors which recorded hourly levels of PM smaller than 2.5 and 10 microns (PM2.5/PM10), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3). We used a case-crossover design to estimate the strength of association between ambient air pollution levels and risk of OHCA.

Results: Between 2000 and 2010, there were 8551 OHCAs that met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 5624 (65.8%) occurred in men. An IQR increase in the 24 and 48 h averages of PM2.5 was associated with 10.6% (OR 1.106, 95% CI 1.038 to 1.180) and 13.6% (OR 1.136, 95% CI 1.051 to 1.228) increases, respectively, in the risk of OHCA. CO showed a consistent association with increased risk of an OHCA. An IQR increase in the 4 h average concentration of CO was associated with a 2.2% (OR 1.022, 95% CI 1.002 to 1.042) increase in risk of an OHCA. When we restricted our analysis of CO to arrests occurring between 6:00 and 10:00, we found a 4.4% (95% CI 1.1% to 7.8%) increase in risk of an OHCA.

Conclusions: Elevated ambient PM2.5 and CO are associated with an increased risk of OHCA. 
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 14 Jul 2014, 14:15:50 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work