Factors affecting seed germination of annual sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus) in southern Australia

Chauhan, Bhagirath S., Gill, Gurjeet and Preston, Christopher (2006) Factors affecting seed germination of annual sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus) in southern Australia. Weed Science, 54 5: 854-860. doi:10.1614/WS-06-047R.1


Author Chauhan, Bhagirath S.
Gill, Gurjeet
Preston, Christopher
Title Factors affecting seed germination of annual sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus) in southern Australia
Formatted title
Factors affecting seed germination of annual sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus) in southern Australia
Journal name Weed Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0043-1745
1550-2759
Publication date 2006-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1614/WS-06-047R.1
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 54
Issue 5
Start page 854
End page 860
Total pages 7
Place of publication Lawrence, KS, United States
Publisher Weed Science Society of America
Language eng
Abstract Annual sowthistle has become more abundant under no-till systems in southern Australia. Increased knowledge of germination biology of annual sowthistle would facilitate development of effective weed control programs. The effects of environmental factors on germination and emergence of annual sowthistle seeds were examined in laboratory and field experiments. Seeds of annual sowthistle were able to germinate over a broad range of temperatures (25/15, 20/12, and 15/9 C day/night temperatures). Seed germination was favored by light; however, some germination occurred in the dark as well. Greater than 90% of seeds germinated at a low level of salinity (40 mM NaCl), and some seeds germinated even at 160 mM NaCl (7.5%). Germination decreased from 95% to 11% as osmotic potential increased from 0 to -0.6 MPa and was completely inhibited at osmotic potential greater than -0.6 MPa. Seed germination was greater than 90% over a pH range of 5 to 8, but declined to 77% at pH 10. Seedling emergence was the greatest (77%) for seeds present on the soil surface but declined with depth, and no seedlings emerged from a soil depth of 5 cm. In another experiment in which seeds were after-ripened at different depths in a field, seed decay was greater on the soil surface than at 2 or 5 cm depth. At the end of the growing season, there was a much greater persistence of buried seed (32 to 42%) than seeds present on the soil surface (8%). Greater persistence of buried seed could be due to dormancy enforced by dark in this species.
Keyword Germination
Light
Osmotic potential
Temperature
Weed seed
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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