Effect of crop residue on seedling emergence and growth of selected weed species in a sprinkler-irrigated zero-till dry-seeded rice system

Chauhan, Bhagirath S. and Abugho, Seth B. (2013) Effect of crop residue on seedling emergence and growth of selected weed species in a sprinkler-irrigated zero-till dry-seeded rice system. Weed Science, 61 3: 403-409. doi:10.1614/WS-D-12-00147.1


Author Chauhan, Bhagirath S.
Abugho, Seth B.
Title Effect of crop residue on seedling emergence and growth of selected weed species in a sprinkler-irrigated zero-till dry-seeded rice system
Journal name Weed Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0043-1745
1550-2759
Publication date 2013-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1614/WS-D-12-00147.1
Volume 61
Issue 3
Start page 403
End page 409
Total pages 7
Place of publication Lawrence, KS, United States
Publisher Weed Science Society of America
Language eng
Subject 1102 Cardiovascular Medicine and Haematology
1110 Nursing
Formatted abstract
Crop residues acting as mulches can influence weed seedling emergence and weed biomass. A field study was conducted to evaluat. The effect of rice residue amounts (0, 3, and 6 t ha-1) on seedling emergence of eight weed species in zero-till dry-seeded rice. The highest seedling emergence of spiny amaranth, southern crabgrass, crowfootgrass, junglerice, eclipta, goosegrass, and Chinese sprangletop was observed I. The absence of residue. Seedling emergence of these weeds declined with increasing residue amounts; however. The greatest and most substantial reductions in emergence occurred with 6 t ha -1 of residue. The presence of residue also resulted in less weed biomass than wit. The no-residue treatment. The emergence and biomass of threelobe morningglory seedlings, however, were not influenced by residue amounts. The use of residue also increase. The time taken to reach 50% of maximum emergence for some species, for example, spiny amaranth and Chinese sprangletop. The results of our study suggest tha. The use of residue at high rates can help suppress seedling emergence and growth of many weeds. However, there is a need to integrate other weed management strategies with residue retention to achieve season-long weed control.

Nomenclature: Spiny amaranth, Amaranthus spinosus L. AMASP; crowfootgrass, Dactyloctenium aegyptium (L.) Willd. DTTAE; southern crabgrass, Digitaria ciliaris (Retz.) Koel. DIGSP; junglerice, Echinochloa colona (L.) Link, ECHCO; eclipta, Eclipta prostrata (L.) L. ECLAL; goosegrass, Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertn. ELEIN; threelobe morningglory, Ipomoea triloba L. IPOTR; Chinese sprangletop, Leptochloa chinensis (L.) Nees. LEFCH; rice, Oryza sativa L. 
Keyword Asia
Mulch
Rice
Weed emergence
Zero-till
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Published July-September 2013.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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