Do the rich fear to fall? How economic stability, among different income groups, affects attitudes towards newcomers

Healty, Nikita (2013). Do the rich fear to fall? How economic stability, among different income groups, affects attitudes towards newcomers Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Healty, Nikita
Thesis Title Do the rich fear to fall? How economic stability, among different income groups, affects attitudes towards newcomers
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Jolanda Jetten
Total pages 94
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Financial uncertainty has increased in the fall out of the global financial crisis and has led to research examining the effects of economic downfall on attitudes towards immigrants. While previous research has found that the poor show more negative attitudes towards newcomers, more recent findings have shown that those in states of economic prosperity can also experience such negative attitudes (Guimond & Dambrun, 2002). Using social identity theorising, this thesis looks to examine stability as a moderator of economic prosperity and attitudes towards newcomers. Specifically, this thesis examined how the stability of income, among groups differing in wealth, affects attitudes towards newcomers, collective angst and self-stereotyping. In the study Australian citizens (N = 132) completed an online survey where participants started a new life as a citizen of Mambiza, a fictitious country. Participants were randomly assigned to the poor, middle or rich income group. Stability of income was also manipulated, with participants randomly assigned to read an article outlining Mambiza’s economy as stable or unstable. A new group was then introduced into Mambiza. Participants went on to answer questions on multiple dependent measures, involving self-stereotyping, collective angst and the main dependent measure, attitudes towards newcomers. Results showed that, as predicted, there were significantly more negative attitudes shown towards immigrants when the economy was perceived as unstable compared to stable. Contrary to predictions, stability did not moderate the relationship between economic prosperity and attitudes towards immigrants. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to immigration and economic conditions.
Keyword economic stability
income groups
attitudes
newcomers

 
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Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2014, 13:31:28 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology