Pain and Conformity: The influence of self-administered pain on in-group conformity

McCoy, Bonnie (2013). Pain and Conformity: The influence of self-administered pain on in-group conformity Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author McCoy, Bonnie
Thesis Title Pain and Conformity: The influence of self-administered pain on in-group conformity
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Brock Bastian
Total pages 54
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary There has been a great deal of research dedicated to understanding how social factors can reduce the experience of pain. However, there has been far less research investigating the opposite relationship; how experiencing pain can influence social factors, such as affiliation. In the current study, we measured conformity as an indicator of affiliation. We investigated how self-administered, laboratory-based pain influences conformity with an in-group decision. After administering pain to half of the participants we used a computer-based interactive group task to measure participant’s levels of conformity. We did this by measuring participants liking of symbols compared to the in-group liking scores when the out-group gave either congruent or incongruent liking scores. We also conducted exploratory analyses to investigate whether attachment style moderated the relationship between pain and conformity. The results show an overall pattern of conformity across trial type, however, pain did not increase conformity as hypothesised. Exploratory analyses suggested that anxious attachment may negatively moderate the relationship between pain and conformity. However, this finding was only made tentatively. The findings of the current study were mixed and provide us with little evidence that our manipulation of pain was sufficient to increase conformity with computer-based group decisions.
Keyword pain
Affiliation
self-administered pain
in-group
conformity

 
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Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2014, 11:11:21 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology