Adult attachment and coping responses to relationship conflict: the mediating role of stress appraisals and attributions

Oberg, Michelle (2013). Adult attachment and coping responses to relationship conflict: the mediating role of stress appraisals and attributions Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Oberg, Michelle
Thesis Title Adult attachment and coping responses to relationship conflict: the mediating role of stress appraisals and attributions
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Judith Feeney
Total pages 96
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Research has shown that attachment processes extend to adult romantic love. Studies have also shown that distress-maintaining attributions and stress appraisals are associated both with attachment dimensions and with coping strategies. The current study is the first to explore the associations among the above variables using bootstrap mediation analysis. A community sample of 343 participants completed questionnaires in relation to a standardised relationship conflict vignette. It was predicted that attachment avoidance and anxiety would be positively associated with stress appraisals and maladaptive attributions. Results supported these predictions except for the relationship between attachment avoidance and distress-maintaining attributions. Positive associations were also predicted between attachment anxiety and hyperactivating coping, and between attachment avoidance and deactivating coping; these predictions were supported. Stress appraisals and maladaptive attributions were also expected to be positively associated with hyperactivating and deactivating coping. These predictions were supported except for an unexpected negative relationship between stress appraisals and deactivating coping. It was further predicted that stress appraisals and attributions would act as mediators between attachment anxiety and hyperactivation, and between attachment avoidance and deactivation. These predictions were largely supported. Lastly, relationship quality was predicted to moderate the associations between attachment anxiety and hyperactivation, and between attachment avoidance and deactivation coping. This prediction was not supported; rather, the results suggested robust relationships between the attachment dimensions and coping strategies. Given that the results generally indicated only partial mediation, it is important for future research to investigate other mechanisms linking attachment insecurities to maladaptive coping.
Keyword Adult Attachment
coping responses
Relationship conflict
Stress Appraisal
Attributions

 
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Created: Fri, 04 Jul 2014, 15:07:49 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology