The design of subcutaneous insulin charts affects calculation of patients’ insulin dose

Petersen, Lennan (2013). The design of subcutaneous insulin charts affects calculation of patients’ insulin dose Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Petersen, Lennan
Thesis Title The design of subcutaneous insulin charts affects calculation of patients’ insulin dose
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Andrew Hill
Total pages 175
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary The current research investigated how the design of insulin charts affects user performance. Errors in the administration of insulin are commonly made and often detrimental to patient outcomes. A new subcutaneous insulin chart, the National Pilot Chart, is currently being piloted at several hospitals. Two experiments investigated whether user performance on this chart could be improved by incremental design changes. The experiments focussed on the task of determining the correct dose to administer to the patient. To do this accurately, the chart-user must take into account the patient’s current blood glucose level and any relevant orders (i.e., prescriptions) for “routine” or “supplemental” insulin recorded on the chart. In each experiment, each participant viewed 80 insulin charts on a computer monitor and calculated the total insulin dose required for each patient. Experiment 1 investigated the effect of a change in the format of the Supplemental Insulin Orders box. Experiment 2 retained the novel Supplemental Insulin Orders box format, and varied the format of the Routine Insulin Orders box. Primarily, these chart design changes involved integrating chart objects so that they shared common dimensions (i.e., rows or columns) with other chart objects. In Experiment 1, participants responded significantly faster and made fewer errors when the Supplemental Insulin Orders box was integrated. In Experiment 2, participants responded significantly faster when the Routine Insulin Orders box was also integrated, although there were no differences in errors between chart designs. The implications for chart design and hospital practice are discussed.
Keyword subcutaneous insulin charts
calculation of dose

 
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Created: Fri, 04 Jul 2014, 14:40:24 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology