Flipping Out! What Effect Does the Perceptual History of Targets Have on an Unambiguous Stream/Bounce Motion Display?

Robertson, Caitlin (2013). Flipping Out! What Effect Does the Perceptual History of Targets Have on an Unambiguous Stream/Bounce Motion Display? Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Robertson, Caitlin
Thesis Title Flipping Out! What Effect Does the Perceptual History of Targets Have on an Unambiguous Stream/Bounce Motion Display?
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Philip Grove
Total pages 77
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary When viewing a motion sequence display where two objects move towards each other, superimpose in the middle (known as the point of coincidence) and cross to the other side, people mostly see the objects streaming past each other. However by introducing an audio or visual transient at the point of coincidence, people are more likely to see the objects bounce and return to their original positions. The effect has been upheld in unambiguous displays where a vertical offset has been used to separate the objects, increasing the likelihood of a streaming perception. While several theories have been proposed to account for why we see the bounce perception, one parsimonious explanation has not been found to explain the bias under different conditions. We hypothesised that an inferential process may occur as a result of the perceptual history of the display and aimed to manipulate the trajectory of the targets on an unambiguous display to explore this. To render the display unambiguous, the targets were offset from collinearity with a small and large vertical offset. Perceptual history was operationalised and manipulated by introducing ‘flips’ into the targets’ trajectories, where the objects jumped from one elevation to another along the trajectory. As hypothesised, we found that as the number of flips increased from zero to four flips, the number of bounce responses also increased and that this effect was stronger with an occluder and tone present. We also hypothesised that the bounce bias would be stronger in trials in the smaller vertical offset condition and this was also supported. Several interactions were found between the variables which are discussed, as are the theoretical implications of this study which suggests that an inferential process drives the transient induced bounce bias in the stream/bounce effect. Directions for future research are also proposed.
Keyword perceptual history
targets
unambiguous stream
bounce motion display

 
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Created: Fri, 04 Jul 2014, 14:04:11 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology