Who I Am Determines How Creative You Are: The Role of Self-Categorization In Perceptions Of Creativity

Slade, Philip (2013). Who I Am Determines How Creative You Are: The Role of Self-Categorization In Perceptions Of Creativity Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Slade, Philip
Thesis Title Who I Am Determines How Creative You Are: The Role of Self-Categorization In Perceptions Of Creativity
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Professor Alex Haslam
Total pages 78
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Creativity and the ability to innovate is one of the most important resources for any culture or organisation to possess if it is to survive. However, dramatic differences in people’s judgements of creativity have been observed, both throughout history and across cultures. This thesis explores mechanisms behind such differences, building on recent research informed by a social identity approach to creativity. This paradigm argues that perceptions of creativity are shaped by the degree to which perceivers share identity with a creator and hence that this varies as a function of the perceiver’s self-categorization and the assumed identity of the creator. To test this proposition, we conducted two experiments that manipulated the salient in-group of a perceiver and the group membership of a creator. Results support claims that selfcategorization is a significant determinant of creative appraisals, and that this interacts with the salient group status of a creator to structure overall perceptions of their creativity. Evidence that this effect is unrelated to likeability or perceived value suggests that the underlying process is not simply one of generic in-group bias. Implications for theory and creative industries are discussed.
Keyword Self-categorization
Perceptions of creativity

 
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Created: Fri, 04 Jul 2014, 13:30:15 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology