Video Self-Modelling: Using the Feedforward Paradigm for the Acquisition of Novel Physical Skills in Young Children

Rogers, Brent (2013). Video Self-Modelling: Using the Feedforward Paradigm for the Acquisition of Novel Physical Skills in Young Children Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
ROGERSBrent4071thesis.pdf Thesis full text application/pdf 800.41KB 1
Author Rogers, Brent
Thesis Title Video Self-Modelling: Using the Feedforward Paradigm for the Acquisition of Novel Physical Skills in Young Children
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-08
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Thomas Suddendorf
Total pages 52
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Video self-modelling (VSM) interventions involve watching oneself on video performing at one’s best. VSM interventions using the feedforward paradigm (to depict a performance higher than previously attained) have proved particularly effective at improving a range of skills and behaviours. VSM’s effectiveness at enhancing physical performance however is inconclusive, and findings to date are mixed. Furthermore, there is uncertainty about whether using VSM or othermodel (OM) videos are more effective. The purpose of the present study was to examine and compare whether a feedforward-based VSM intervention and OM video intervention would enhance the acquisition and performance of novel physical skills. Thirty-six, 5-year old children were randomly assigned to complete three tasks, each assigned to a different condition (VSM, OM, or no video control). Both a within-participants and between groups design was used. Baseline and post-intervention task performance scores were taken across two sessions. Contrary to expectations, there were no significant differences in the level of improvement on any of the three tasks between the VSM, OM, and control groups. Additionally, whether a task was assigned to the VSM, OM, or control condition made no significant difference to a child’s degree of improvement on that task. These findings offer no support for the notion that VSM is effective in enhancing physical skill performance. Methodological issues and challenges that may have undermined findings are discussed, as well as considerations and recommendations for future research.
Keyword Video Self-Modelling
feedforward paradigm
novel physical skills
Young children

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 03 Jul 2014, 15:01:16 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology