Utilization and preference of nutrition information sources in Australia

Cash, Tracee, Desbrow, Ben, Leveritt, Michael and Ball, Lauren (2014) Utilization and preference of nutrition information sources in Australia. Health Expectations, 18 6: 2288-2295. doi:10.1111/hex.12198


Author Cash, Tracee
Desbrow, Ben
Leveritt, Michael
Ball, Lauren
Title Utilization and preference of nutrition information sources in Australia
Journal name Health Expectations   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1369-7625
1369-6513
Publication date 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/hex.12198
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 18
Issue 6
Start page 2288
End page 2295
Total pages 8
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background
The prevalence of chronic disease in Australia is rising, and poor nutrition behaviour is a modifiable risk factor for many chronic diseases. The utilization of appropriate nutrition information has been recommended to promote optimal nutrition behaviour.

Objective
To investigate individuals’ utilization and preference of nutrition information sources as well as perceptions of trustworthiness, credibility and effectiveness of sources.

Design
Cross-sectional online survey.

Setting and Participants
Ninety-four residents of the Gold Coast, Australia.

Main Outcome Measures Studied
Respondents’ demographic variables, previously utilized and preferred nutrition information sources, perceptions of trustworthiness, credibility and effectiveness of nutrition information sources.

Results
Dietitians, nutritionists and GPs were the three most preferred sources and were perceived to be most trustworthy, credible and effective. However, the most utilized nutrition information sources were the Internet (62.9%), friends (59.8%), family (58.8%) and magazines (57.7%). Over 30% of respondents reported time to attend appointments as a barrier to accessing their most preferred nutrition information sources. Between 32 and 60% of respondents reported neutral perceptions of the most frequently utilized nutrition information sources in relation to trustworthiness, credibility and effectiveness.

Conclusion
Individuals frequently receive nutrition information from sources that are not their most preferred and sources that they do not perceive as trustworthy, credible or effective. Further research is warranted on the impact of these discrepancies on overall nutrition-related health literacy and behaviour.
Keyword Chronic disease
Credibility
Effectiveness
Nutrition information
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 6 May 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 03 Jul 2014, 13:29:28 EST by Michael Leveritt on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences