Emerging confidently in the direction of their dreams: Aspirations during emerging adulthood

Vanderham, Monique (2013). Emerging confidently in the direction of their dreams: Aspirations during emerging adulthood Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Vanderham, Monique
Thesis Title Emerging confidently in the direction of their dreams: Aspirations during emerging adulthood
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Melissa Johnstone
Total pages 95
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary The Theory of Emerging Adulthood (Arnett, 2000) postulates that from ages 18 to 29 years individuals in western cultures engage in a period of self-focused identity exploration characterised by instability in their relationships, employment and living situation, and mental health. This thesis aims to investigate emerging adults’ confidence in their ability to achieve their relationship, parenthood, and career aspirations, by examining the psychosocial predictors of relationship status, depression, and the importance they attach to achieving their career and family aspirations. Hypotheses predicted that being in a relationship would predict higher confidence in achieving relationship and parenthood aspirations, and age would moderate these relationships. Also single, older participants would be the least confident in achieving relationship and parenthood aspirations. Additionally, women attaching high importance to careers would have decreased confidence in achieving relationship and parenthood aspirations, while women attaching high importance to parenthood would have decreased confidence in achieving career aspirations. Finally, depression would be associated with less confidence in achieving relationship, parenthood, and career aspirations. A community sample of emerging adults aged 18 to 29 years (n = 366) completed an online questionnaire. Results revealed that being single or depressed was significantly associated with decreased confidence in achieving relationship, parenthood, and career aspirations. Inconsistent with hypotheses, the importance of careers was not related to decreased confidence for relationship or parenthood aspirations for women; nor were single, older emerging adults less confident in achieving their relationship or parenthood aspirations. The importance of parenthood was not associated with confidence in career aspirations. Unexpectedly, men rating career achievement as important had higher confidence in achieving their relationship aspirations. Implications of these findings and future directions are discussed.
Keyword aspirations
emerging adulthood

 
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Created: Thu, 03 Jul 2014, 11:15:18 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology