Are children's asthmatic symptoms related to ambient temperature? a panel study in Australia

Li, Shanshan, Baker, Peter J., Jalaludin, Bin B., Guo, Yuming, Marks, Guy B., Denison, Lyn S. and Williams, Gail M. (2014) Are children's asthmatic symptoms related to ambient temperature? a panel study in Australia. Environmental Research, 133 239-245. doi:10.1016/j.envres.2014.05.032


Author Li, Shanshan
Baker, Peter J.
Jalaludin, Bin B.
Guo, Yuming
Marks, Guy B.
Denison, Lyn S.
Williams, Gail M.
Title Are children's asthmatic symptoms related to ambient temperature? a panel study in Australia
Journal name Environmental Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0013-9351
1096-0953
Publication date 2014-08
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.envres.2014.05.032
Open Access Status
Volume 133
Start page 239
End page 245
Total pages 7
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives
To examine the short-term effects of ambient temperature on respiratory symptoms for school children with asthma across Australia.

Methods
A panel of 270 children (7–12 years) with asthma was recruited from six Australian cities. They were asked to record their respiratory symptoms every day in the morning (for night-time symptoms) and evening (for daytime symptoms) for four weeks. Daily ambient temperature, relative humidity and air pollution data were obtained from fixed monitors nearby. A mixed logistic regression model was used to examine the effects of ambient temperature on respiratory symptoms adjusted for children׳s sex, age, standing height, weight and air pollution. Subjects were specified as random effects.

Results
The relationships between ambient temperature and respiratory symptoms were linear. Increasing temperatures induced the risks of children׳s asthmatic symptoms, especially for “wheeze/chest tightness” and to a lesser extent for “cough/phlegm”. The effects were acute and lasted for four days (lag 0–3) in general. With increasing ambient temperature, boys were more at risk than girls.

Conclusions
High ambient temperature is a risk factor for respiratory symptoms in children with asthma. As ambient temperature increases, policies and strategies for rising temperatures will be necessary to protect asthmatic children.
Keyword Asthma
Children
Panel study
Respiratory symptoms
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 02 Jul 2014, 15:26:37 EST by Yuming Guo on behalf of School of Public Health