Linking Resilience to Task Outcomes during a Demanding Work Simulation: The Role of Control and Adaptive Coping

Loakes, Jennifer (2013). Linking Resilience to Task Outcomes during a Demanding Work Simulation: The Role of Control and Adaptive Coping Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Loakes, Jennifer
Thesis Title Linking Resilience to Task Outcomes during a Demanding Work Simulation: The Role of Control and Adaptive Coping
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Stacey Parker
Total pages 111
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Resilience is an individual difference with a well-established relationship to a variety of positive employee and organisational outcomes. Defined as the psychological capacity to adapt and cope with adversity, resilience is a particularly useful resource during periods of stress. Less well known, is how resilience may interact with external resources, particularly control, and the process through which positive outcomes are achieved. The aim of this study was to explore whether the relationship between resilience and adaptive coping (i.e., planning coping and positive reappraisal), and resilience and positive task outcomes (i.e., mastery perceptions and task performance) is moderated by the amount of control available to the individual during a demanding work task. Recognising that the relationship between resilience and task outcomes is indirect, the adaptive coping strategies were examined as a mediating mechanism through which high control enables highly resilient individuals to experience higher mastery perceptions and better task performance. A sample of first year psychology students (N = 94) completed a demanding email inbox activity under experimentally manipulated conditions of low or high control. Moderated hierarchical regression analysis revealed a significant interaction between resilience and control on planning coping, positive reappraisal, and mastery perceptions, but not task performance. Results were consistent with the hypothesised moderated mediation model, where planning coping mediated the positive relationship between resilience and mastery perceptions, but only at high levels of control. These findings suggest that for highly resilient individuals, control is a key for facilitating more adaptive coping, specifically implementing planning coping strategies, which then increases resilient individuals’ mastery perceptions. The practical implications of the findings are discussed including the implications for job design.
Keyword Resilience
task outcomes
demanding work simulation
control
adaptive coping

 
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Created: Wed, 02 Jul 2014, 15:04:20 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology