Time isn’t dragging, it’s going backwards: Illusory time reversals and saccadic eye movements

Kresevic, Jesse (2013). Time isn’t dragging, it’s going backwards: Illusory time reversals and saccadic eye movements Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Kresevic, Jesse
Thesis Title Time isn’t dragging, it’s going backwards: Illusory time reversals and saccadic eye movements
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Derek Arnold
Total pages 67
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Saccades are very rapid eye movements that are associated with a number of strange phenomena, such as an illusory reversal in the order in which two successive stimuli appear to have been presented when the second of the two events is presented at the beginning of or mid - saccade. It is thought that this apparent reversal of time is related to mechanisms underlying saccadic suppression; a period of visual insensitivity that occurs during a saccade. This, however, remains a largely untested assertion. Th is thesis explores an alternat iv e explanation – that apparent order reversals around the time of saccades result from an individual bias to adopt a particular inferential response strategy when judging an ambiguous display. Consistent with this premise, th is thesis finds that all participants experience saccadic suppression, but only some show evidence for illusory order reversals. These results suggest that a prominent model of time perception about the time of saccades, which invokes Einstein’s theory of special relativity, will have to be reprised.
Keyword illusory time reversals
Saccadic Eye-Movements

 
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Created: Wed, 02 Jul 2014, 13:02:20 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology