The Mediating Role of Stress Appraisals in the Attachment-Coping Association: Applications to Couple Conflict

Hughes, Leishan (2013). The Mediating Role of Stress Appraisals in the Attachment-Coping Association: Applications to Couple Conflict Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
HUGHESLeishan4091thesis.pdf Thesis full text application/pdf 484.22KB 7
Author Hughes, Leishan
Thesis Title The Mediating Role of Stress Appraisals in the Attachment-Coping Association: Applications to Couple Conflict
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Judith Feeney
Total pages 80
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Relationship conflict can have detrimental effects on individuals’ health and wellbeing, particularly when responses to conflict are inappropriate. Attachment theory posits that in times of threat, individual differences in attachment style become more apparent. This proposition can be extended to romantic couples, and attachment theory has recently been linked to adults’ coping strategies. The present study examined stress appraisals as a mediator between attachment dimensions and coping strategies. A community sample of 376 participants completed an online self-report survey measuring relationship length, relationship quality, attachment dimensions (anxiety and avoidance), stress appraisals (threat) and coping strategies (hyperactivation, deactivation and constructive); stress appraisals and coping strategies were measured with reference to a standardised conflict vignette, ensuring that all participants responded to the same conflict scenario. It was predicted that the association between attachment anxiety and hyperactivation would be mediated by perceived threat. A research question also addressed the links among attachment avoidance, perceived threat and deactivation, and further analyses assessed whether relationship length and relationship quality moderated the link between attachment anxiety and hyperactivation. Results supported perceived threat as a partial mediator between attachment anxiety and hyperactivation. A moderating effect of relationship length was found, with the effect of attachment anxiety being weaker in shorter relationships. Results support the relevance of attachment theory to the study of stress and coping. Future research should address other potential mediators and employ longitudinal designs, so as to further inform interventions for distressed couples.
Keyword Mediating role
Stress Appraisal
attachment coping association
couple conflict

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 02 Jul 2014, 09:35:26 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology