Rumination: a mediator in the relationship between mindfulness and well-being

Howley, Jordan (2013). Rumination: a mediator in the relationship between mindfulness and well-being Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Howley, Jordan
Thesis Title Rumination: a mediator in the relationship between mindfulness and well-being
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Kenneth Packenham
Total pages 91
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Current research has shown that higher levels of mindfulness beneficially impact wellbeing, both psychologically and physically. A number of mechanisms, such as rumination, have been proposed to facilitate this relationship. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether decreased rumination mediates the beneficial effects of mindfulness on well-being. It was expected that lower rumination would mediate the beneficial effects of higher mindfulness on well-being. A total of 100 undergraduate students from the University of Queensland completed self-report measures of mindfulness (Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire), rumination (Response Styles Questionnaire) and various dimensions of well-being including psychological well-being (Psychological Well-being Scale), emotional distress (DASS-21) and somatisation (subscale from the Brief Symptom Inventory). Mediation analyses revealed full and partial mediation effects. Reduced rumination fully mediated the beneficial effects of total mindfulness on anxiety. Rumination fully mediated the non-judgement and non-reactivity facets of mindfulness on dimensions of emotional distress (global distress, depression, anxiety and stress) as well as environmental mastery. No mediation effects were found for somatisation and dimensions of psychological well-being (except environmental mastery). The findings suggest that rumination mediates the beneficial effects of mindfulness on emotional distress and environmental mastery. Further research on the mechanisms through which mindfulness influences well-being is required.
Keyword Rumination
mediator
mindfulness
Wellbeing

 
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Created: Wed, 02 Jul 2014, 09:28:57 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology