She took the ladder up with her! A study investigating the effects of female intrasexual competition amongst women in the workplace

Hager, Melissa I. (2013). She took the ladder up with her! A study investigating the effects of female intrasexual competition amongst women in the workplace Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Hager, Melissa I.
Thesis Title She took the ladder up with her! A study investigating the effects of female intrasexual competition amongst women in the workplace
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Shelli Dubbs
Total pages 71
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary The ‘Queen Bee’ phenomenon amongst women in the workplace was investigated using the evolutionary theory of intrasexual competition, as individual differences in female intrasexual competition may shape women’s competitive behaviour impacting workrelated outcomes. In addition, attractiveness of female job applicants and how this may interact with intrasexual competition and hiring decisions was investigated. Participants included 155 females (M= 32.12, SD = 10.98) from Australia and the U.S. completing the study online. Buunk and Fisher’s (2009) Intrasexual Competition scale was used to measure individual differences, hiring outcomes were measured using the newly created Applicant Perceptions Scale which measured likelihood to be a good worker, derogation and suggested starting salary. Job satisfaction and supervisor satisfaction were measured using the Job Descriptive Index. A job description and two potential female job applicants, manipulated to be attractive or unattractive, were presented to participants. Women higher in intrasexual competition were found to derogate the female applicant but they did not perceive the applicant as less of a good worker nor did they suggest a lower starting salary rate. No effect of applicant attractiveness was found. Furthermore, women higher in intrasexual competition did not display lower levels of job satisfaction; however, they were less satisfied with their supervisor. Whether the participant had a female supervisor or was working in a predominantly female environment had no effect. Women higher in intrasexual competition working for a female supervisor or in a predominantly female environment also had no effect on job or supervisor satisfaction. The findings suggest intrasexual competition may shape competiveness amongst women at work, potentially impacting work-related outcomes. Further research is recommended before any conclusive statements are made as the results suggest the intrasexual competition scale used may not be the most accurate measure of individual differences.
Keyword Female intrasexual competition
workplace

 
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Created: Tue, 01 Jul 2014, 14:22:09 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology