Fair is unfair: How the disadvantaged appraise and respond to the legitimacy of discrimination

Gordon-King, Keely (2013). Fair is unfair: How the disadvantaged appraise and respond to the legitimacy of discrimination Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Gordon-King, Keely
Thesis Title Fair is unfair: How the disadvantaged appraise and respond to the legitimacy of discrimination
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Aarti Iyer
Total pages 102
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Discrimination is often assumed to be unfair. However, recent evidence suggests that victims can legitimize discrimination, perceiving it as fair and justified (Jetten, Schmitt, Branscombe, Garza & Mewse, 2011). The current study aimed to identify predictors of perceived legitimacy within disadvantaged groups. It also aimed to test perceived legitimacy as a mediator between those predictors and actions to challenge discrimination. The study examined the effects of group identification and personal relevance, which were manipulated using brainstorming tasks and a written scenario, respectively. Dependent variables were perceived legitimacy, intentions to engage in collective action, and individual action intentions. Overall, partial support was found for hypotheses. In the high group identification condition, high personal relevance resulted in higher individual action intentions than low personal relevance. High group identification resulted in higher intentions to engage in high-cost collective action than low group identification. All other hypothesised effects were not significant. Post hoc mediation analyses used the personal relevance manipulation check as a predictor, and indicated that perceived legitimacy mediated the relationship between measured personal relevance and other dependent variables. Perceived legitimacy did not mediate the relationship between the group identification manipulation check and dependent variables. Results were subject to multiple limitations. However, the current study suggests that perceived legitimacy may influence responses to discrimination, highlighting the need for future research
Keyword disadvantaged
Discrimination

 
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Created: Tue, 01 Jul 2014, 14:18:45 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology