The effects of a displayed cognitive aid on non-technical skills in a simulated 'can't intubate, can't oxygenate' crisis

Marshall, S. D. and Mehra, R. (2014) The effects of a displayed cognitive aid on non-technical skills in a simulated 'can't intubate, can't oxygenate' crisis. Anaesthesia, 69 7: 669-677. doi:10.1111/anae.12601


Author Marshall, S. D.
Mehra, R.
Title The effects of a displayed cognitive aid on non-technical skills in a simulated 'can't intubate, can't oxygenate' crisis
Journal name Anaesthesia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1365-2044
0003-2409
Publication date 2014-07
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/anae.12601
Open Access Status
Volume 69
Issue 7
Start page 669
End page 677
Total pages 9
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Guidelines outlining recommended actions are difficult to implement in the stressful, time-pressured situation of an airway emergency. Cognitive aids such as posters and algorithms improve performance during some anaesthetic emergencies; however, their effects on team behaviours have not been determined. In this study, 64 participants were randomly assigned into control (no cognitive aid) and intervention (cognitive aid provided) groups before a simulated 'can't intubate, can't oxygenate' scenario. Video analysis was undertaken of the non-technical skills and technical performance during the scenarios. All categories had higher Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills (ANTS) scores when a cognitive aid was supplied (mean (SD) total ANTS score 10.4 (3.1) vs 13.2 (2.4), p < 0.001). The number of times the cognitive aid was used was associated with higher ANTS scores (ρ = 0.383, p = 0.002). A trend towards the establishment of an infraglottic airway within 3 min was also noted (control group 55.3% vs intervention 76.9%, p = 0.076). Non-technical skills are improved when a cognitive aid is present during airway emergencies.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 18 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 18 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 01 Jul 2014, 02:01:15 EST by System User on behalf of School of Psychology