Valhallolz: medievalist humor on the internet

Wilkins, Kim (2014) Valhallolz: medievalist humor on the internet. Postmedieval, 5 2: 199-214. doi:10.1057/pmed.2014.14


Author Wilkins, Kim
Title Valhallolz: medievalist humor on the internet
Journal name Postmedieval   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2040-5960
2040-5979
Publication date 2014
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1057/pmed.2014.14
Open Access Status
Volume 5
Issue 2
Start page 199
End page 214
Total pages 16
Editor Louise D'Arcens
Place of publication Basingstoke, Hants, United Kingdom
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Subject 3316 Cultural Studies
1211 Philosophy
1208 Literature and Literary Theory
1202 Building
Formatted abstract
The Internet provides social conditions that allow medievalist ideas to continue to evolve in the twenty-first century. It is fertile ground for medievalist humor, and a significant proportion of that humor comes in the form of memes. Memes were first described in 1976 by Richard Dawkins as 'units of cultural transmission.' They are analogous to genes, replicating and mutating in response to the culture that hosts them, and passed on socially, rather than biologically. The Internet provides a ready social network and an accessible set of technological tools for memes to flourish. This essay explores the ways in which Internet memes foreground the social relations that structure medievalist humor.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Communication and Arts Publications
 
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