Characteristics of the personal and environmental components of person-environment fit in very old age: a comparison between people with self-reported Parkinson’s disease and matched controls

Slaug, Bjorn, Nilsson, Maria H. and Iwarsson, Susanne (2013) Characteristics of the personal and environmental components of person-environment fit in very old age: a comparison between people with self-reported Parkinson’s disease and matched controls. Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, 25 6: 667-675. doi:10.1007/s40520-013-0165-z


Author Slaug, Bjorn
Nilsson, Maria H.
Iwarsson, Susanne
Title Characteristics of the personal and environmental components of person-environment fit in very old age: a comparison between people with self-reported Parkinson’s disease and matched controls
Journal name Aging Clinical and Experimental Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1720-8319
Publication date 2013-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s40520-013-0165-z
Open Access Status
Volume 25
Issue 6
Start page 667
End page 675
Total pages 9
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background and aims: To investigate differences and similarities in person-environment (P-E) fit problems between very old people with self-reported Parkinson's disease (PD) and matched controls.

Methods: Data collected for the cross-national ENABLE-AGE Survey Study were used to identify people with self-reported PD (n = 20), and to select three matched controls per individual (n = 60). The matching criteria were age (mean = 82 years), sex, country, and type of housing. The data analysis targeted P-E fit (i.e. accessibility) problems, including studying the personal and environmental components separately. The personal component was analyzed in terms of functional limitations, and the environmental component in terms of physical environmental barriers.

Results: In comparison to the matched controls, the participants with PD had more functional limitations, used more mobility devices and were subjected to more P-E fit problems, though the number of environmental barriers did not differ from the controls. In the PD sample, P-E fit problems were significantly stronger associated with poor balance and incoordination, and the environmental barriers that generated the most severe P-E fit problems were more often located to the exterior surroundings of the housing compared to the controls.

Conclusions: The novel contribution of this explorative study is the demonstration of the type of knowledge that can be generated by unfolding and comparing the composition of P-E fit (accessibility) problems among people with self-reported PD as compared with matched controls. The knowledge thereby generated can be used to develop more targeted rehabilitation approaches, efficient housing adaptation services and societal planning for people with neurodegenerative disorders. 
Keyword Accessibility
ENABLE-AGE
Environmental barriers
Housing
Housing enabler
P-E fit
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 26 Jun 2014, 14:06:45 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work