Measles and ancient plagues: a note on new scientific evidence

Manley, Jennifer (2014) Measles and ancient plagues: a note on new scientific evidence. Classical World, 107 3: 393-397. doi:10.1353/clw.2014.0001

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Author Manley, Jennifer
Title Measles and ancient plagues: a note on new scientific evidence
Journal name Classical World   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1558-9234
0009-8418
Publication date 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1353/clw.2014.0001
Volume 107
Issue 3
Start page 393
End page 397
Total pages 5
Place of publication Baltimore, MD, United States
Publisher The Johns Hopkins University Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract A number of diseases are frequently cited as possible causes for the plagues of antiquity. Amongst these, measles is often mentioned. However, recent scientific advances based on studies of the molecular clock of the virus have shown that measles is too “young” in evolutionary terms to have been the cause of either the Athenian Plague or the Antonine Plague. This paper draws scholars’ attention to the implications of this discovery and its broader consequences for our approach to diagnosing ancient plagues.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
 
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