Optimisation of resin extraction from an Australian arid grass 'Triodia pungens' and its preliminary evaluation as an anti-termite timber coating

Amiralian, Nasim, Annamalai, Pratheep K., Fitzgerald, Chris, Memmott, Paul and Martin, Darren J. (2014) Optimisation of resin extraction from an Australian arid grass 'Triodia pungens' and its preliminary evaluation as an anti-termite timber coating. Industrial Crops and Products, 59 241-247. doi:10.1016/j.indcrop.2014.04.045


Author Amiralian, Nasim
Annamalai, Pratheep K.
Fitzgerald, Chris
Memmott, Paul
Martin, Darren J.
Title Optimisation of resin extraction from an Australian arid grass 'Triodia pungens' and its preliminary evaluation as an anti-termite timber coating
Journal name Industrial Crops and Products   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0926-6690
1872-633X
Publication date 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2014.04.045
Open Access Status
Volume 59
Start page 241
End page 247
Total pages 7
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Subject 1102 Cardiovascular Medicine and Haematology
Abstract Spinifex grasses are the dominant vegetative component in Australian grassland habitats, covering approximately 26% of the Australian landmass. Our ongoing work explores the utility of both the cellulosic and resinous components of this abundant biomass for modern applications and a potential economy for our Aboriginal collaborators. This study is focused on the optimisation of a resin extraction process using solvent, and the subsequent evaluation, via a field trial, of the potential use and efficacy of the resin as an anti-termite coating material. Termiticidal performance was evaluated by re-dissolving the extracted resin in acetone and coating on pine timber blocks. The resin-coated and control blocks were then exposed to a colony of Mastotermes darwiniensis' (Froggatt) termites, which are the most primitive alive and destructive species in subterranean area, at a trial site in northeast Australia, for six months. The results clearly showed that spinifex resin effectively protected the timber from termite attack, while the uncoated control samples were extensively damaged. By demonstrating an enhanced termite resistance, we here report that plant resins that are produced by arid/semi-arid grasses could be potentially used as treatments to prevent termite attack.
Keyword Aboriginal economy
Mastotermes darwiniensis
Protective coating
Spinifex resin
Termite resistance
Triodia pungens
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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