Examining the time course of young and older adults' mimicry of enjoyment and nonenjoyment smiles

Slessor, Gillian, Bailey, Phoebe E., Rendell, Peter G., Ruffman, Ted, Henry, Julie D. and Miles, Lynden K. (2014) Examining the time course of young and older adults' mimicry of enjoyment and nonenjoyment smiles. Emotion, 14 3: 532-544. doi:10.1037/a0035825


Author Slessor, Gillian
Bailey, Phoebe E.
Rendell, Peter G.
Ruffman, Ted
Henry, Julie D.
Miles, Lynden K.
Title Examining the time course of young and older adults' mimicry of enjoyment and nonenjoyment smiles
Journal name Emotion   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1931-1516
1528-3542
Publication date 2014-06
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/a0035825
Open Access Status
Volume 14
Issue 3
Start page 532
End page 544
Total pages 13
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Electromyographic (EMG) research suggests that implicit mimicry of happy facial expressions remains intact with age. However, age-related differences in EMG responses to enjoyment and nonenjoyment smiles have not been explored. The present study assessed younger and older adults’ orbicularis oculi (O.oculi; eye) and zygomaticus major (Z.major; cheek) reactions to images of individuals displaying enjoyment and nonenjoyment smiles. Both age groups mimicked displays of enjoyment smiles, and there were no age differences in O.oculi and Z.major activity to these expressions. However, compared with younger participants, older adults showed extended O.oculi activity to nonenjoyment smiles. In an explicit ratings task, older adults were also more likely than younger participants to attribute feelings of happiness to individuals displaying both nonenjoyment and enjoyment smiles. However, participants’ ratings of the happiness expressed in images of enjoyment and nonenjoyment smiles were independent of their O.oculi responding to these expressions, suggesting that mimicry and emotion recognition may reflect separate processes. Potential mechanisms underlying these findings, as well as implications for social affiliation in older adulthood, are considered.
Keyword Electromyography
Facial expression mimicry
Aging
Smiles
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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