Insulin sensitivity decreases with obesity, and lean cats with low insulin sensitivity are at greatest risk of glucose intolerance with weight gain

Appleton, D.J., Rand, J.S. and Sunvold, G.D. (2001) Insulin sensitivity decreases with obesity, and lean cats with low insulin sensitivity are at greatest risk of glucose intolerance with weight gain. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 3 4: 211-228. doi:10.1053/jfms.2001.0138


Author Appleton, D.J.
Rand, J.S.
Sunvold, G.D.
Title Insulin sensitivity decreases with obesity, and lean cats with low insulin sensitivity are at greatest risk of glucose intolerance with weight gain
Journal name Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1098-612X
Publication date 2001-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1053/jfms.2001.0138
Volume 3
Issue 4
Start page 211
End page 228
Total pages 18
Place of publication London
Publisher WB Saunders
Language eng
Subject 0707 Veterinary Sciences
Abstract This study quantifies the effects of marked weight gain on glucose and insulin metabolism in 16 cats which increased their weight by an average of 44.2% over 10 months. Significantly, the development of feline obesity was accompanied by a 52% decrease in tissue sensitivity to insulin and diminished glucose effectiveness. In addition, glucose intolerance and abnormal insulin response occurred in some cats. An important finding was that normal weight cats with low insulin sensitivity and glucose effectiveness were at increased risk of developing impaired glucose tolerance with obesity. High basal insulin concentrations or low acute insulin response to glucose also independently increased the risk for developing impaired glucose tolerance. Male cats gained more weight relative to females and this, combined with their tendency to lower insulin sensitivity and higher insulin concentrations, may explain why male cats are at greater risk for diabetes. Results suggest an underlying predisposition for glucose intolerance in some cats, which is exacerbated by obesity. These cats may be more at risk of progressing to overt type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright 2001 European Society of Feline Medicine.
Keyword Animals
Cats - diseases
Diabetes in cats
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 03 May 2006, 23:40:42 EST