Continuous self-report of engagement to live solo marimba performance

Broughton, Mary, Stevens, Catherine and Schubert, Emery (2008). Continuous self-report of engagement to live solo marimba performance. In: Ken'ichi Miyazaki, Y. Hiraga, M. Adachi, Y. Nakajima and M. Tsuzaki, Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition. ICMPC10: 10th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, Sapporo, Japan, (366-371). 25-29 August, 2008.

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Author Broughton, Mary
Stevens, Catherine
Schubert, Emery
Title of paper Continuous self-report of engagement to live solo marimba performance
Conference name ICMPC10: 10th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition
Conference location Sapporo, Japan
Conference dates 25-29 August, 2008
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition
Place of Publication Hokkaido, Japan
Publisher Department of Psychology, Hokkaido University
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9784990420802
Editor Ken'ichi Miyazaki
Y. Hiraga
M. Adachi
Y. Nakajima
M. Tsuzaki
Start page 366
End page 371
Total pages 12
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Laboratory-controlled experiments have demonstrated that expressive bodily move- ment (or lack thereof) can contribute positively (or negatively) to assessments of marimba performance. The experiment reported here investigates audience continu- ous self-report engagement responses gathered via the portable Audience Response Facility (pARF). The stimulus material was a solo marimba piece performed in a live concert. A female musician performed two musically similar sections within the piece in two different performance manners (deadpan and projected). The second-order standard deviation threshold method analysed signal reliability. As hypothesised, mean engagement responses were greater in the projected sample than the deadpan sample. Reliable signal was only observed in the projected sample. Difference between deadpan and projected sample mean engagement responses may be due to expressive bodily movement from the performance manner manipulation; alternatively, an order effect may be responsible. Experimentation in ecologically valid settings enables understanding of audience perception of music performance as it unfolds in time.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Presented during Performance III as Oral Presentation 2PM2-R03-2.

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Music Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 20 Jun 2014, 13:05:44 EST by Mary Broughton on behalf of School of Music