The Effects of Preparation and Acoustic Stimulation on Contralateral and Ipsilateral Corticospinal Excitability During an Anticipatory Action

Flannery, Victoria (2013). The Effects of Preparation and Acoustic Stimulation on Contralateral and Ipsilateral Corticospinal Excitability During an Anticipatory Action Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Flannery, Victoria
Thesis Title The Effects of Preparation and Acoustic Stimulation on Contralateral and Ipsilateral Corticospinal Excitability During an Anticipatory Action
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Welber Marinovic
Total pages 91
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary A loud auditory stimulus (LAS) presented together with an imperative stimulus during preparation for motor actions can speed the initiation of our actions. This effect has been attributed to the subcortical storage of motor plans as a LAS has been shown to inhibit the primary motor cortex (M1). Given the anatomy of our auditory system, a LAS will reach cortical areas in both neural hemispheres. This study investigated the impact of a LAS on the corticospinal excitability of the contralateral and ipsilateral M1, while participants prepared for a voluntary abduction of the index finger. In experiment one, experimenters attempted to identify the pattern of modulation of the ipsilateral cortex by determining the time course of cortical changes in anticipatory timing actions using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In experiment two, the impact of a LAS on the ipsilateral and contralateral M1 during anticipatory preparation was investigated. Results found no modulation of ipsilateral corticospinal excitability during preparation, but indicated an increase in excitability after electromyogram onset. Moreover, findings revealed that a LAS increased corticospinal excitability on the contralateral side when the LAS was presented late in the course of preparation, but had little effect on the ipsilateral motor cortex. There was no evidence that corticospinal excitability of the M1 was reduced by a LAS during preparation, suggesting that the proposal of subcortical storage of motor plans was precipitate. This project advanced basic understanding of corticospinal excitability changes in both ipsilateral and contralateral motor cortices during preparation for an anticipatory action.
Keyword Preparation
acoustic stimulation
Contralateral
ipsilateral
Corticospinal excitability
Anticipatory activity

 
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Created: Fri, 20 Jun 2014, 00:52:03 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology