She loves me, she loves me not: Attachment dimensions as predictors of attributions, conflict behaviours and perceived ongoing relationship problems

D'Silva, Raichelle (2013). She loves me, she loves me not: Attachment dimensions as predictors of attributions, conflict behaviours and perceived ongoing relationship problems Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author D'Silva, Raichelle
Thesis Title She loves me, she loves me not: Attachment dimensions as predictors of attributions, conflict behaviours and perceived ongoing relationship problems
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Judith Feeney
Total pages 79
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Effective conflict management behaviours are essential for maintaining a happy and healthy relationship. This study tested the proposition that adult attachment dimensions (attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance), which develop in part from childhood attachment experiences, are linked to conflict behaviours and to the attributions (causal and responsibility) that are made regarding negative partner behaviour. Further, it was proposed that these conflict behaviours have an impact on perceptions that conflict will lead to ongoing relational problems. A community sample (N = 346) of individuals in couple relationships of at least three months’ duration was recruited from the researchers’ social networks. This study evaluated a theoretical model that included attributions and conflict behaviours (verbal attack, problem-solving and conflict avoidance) as mediators between attachment and perceptions of ongoing problems. Results revealed that attributions mediated the association between attachment anxiety and ongoing relationship problems. Further, as predicted, conflict avoidance mediated the association between attachment avoidance and ongoing relationship problems, and verbal attack mediated the association between attachment anxiety and ongoing relationship problems. Surprisingly, results also showed a significant positive association between attachment anxiety and problem-solving behaviour; however, problem-solving did not act as a mediator between attachment anxiety and ongoing relationship problems. Strengths of this study include the use of a large and representative sample, therefore improving the generalizability of the results; limitations include the cross-sectional design, which cannot directly test causal relationships. Theoretical implications are also discussed.

 
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Created: Wed, 18 Jun 2014, 10:38:07 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology