Yarrabah Aboriginal English : a study of the salient linguistic differences between Aboriginal English and Australian English as revealed in the speech of four Aboriginal children in Yarrabah Aboriginal Settlement in north Queensland

Alexander, Diane Helen (1965). Yarrabah Aboriginal English : a study of the salient linguistic differences between Aboriginal English and Australian English as revealed in the speech of four Aboriginal children in Yarrabah Aboriginal Settlement in north Queensland Honours Thesis, School of English, Media Studies and Art History, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Alexander, Diane Helen
Thesis Title Yarrabah Aboriginal English : a study of the salient linguistic differences between Aboriginal English and Australian English as revealed in the speech of four Aboriginal children in Yarrabah Aboriginal Settlement in north Queensland
School, Centre or Institute School of English, Media Studies and Art History
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1965
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor E.H. Flint
Total pages 149
Language eng
Subjects 2003 Language Studies
2002 Cultural Studies
Formatted abstract

OUTLINE OF RESEARCH

1. This investigation was carried out under the Queensland Speech Survey which aims at describing all the principal varieties of English spoken in Queensland. Previous research in Aboriginal English spoken in Queensland has been conducted under the Survey by C.A. Readdy,1 "South Queensland Aboriginal English", 1961, and by T.E. Dutton, "Some Phonological Aspects of Palm Island Aboriginal English", 1964.2

2. The study of the English spoken by aboriginal children has an important bearing on their education, and on the problem of assimilation. The Government aims at assimilation of the aborigines, and it is agreed that education has an important part to play in implementing this policy. Scientific linguistic research on Aboriginal English is needed for data on which to base an education policy. (See Section 2A).

3. The material for this investigation was collected at Yarrabah by Mr. E.H. Flint in October, 1964, under the Queensland Speech Survey. The present Research Worker was engaged in making an examination of this material with a view to analysing the salient differences from Australian English, and eventually comparing thorn with those of Miss Readdy and Mr. Dutton.

4. A systematic scientific approach was followed in the investigation:

(a) systematic collection of material,

(b) close and careful examination, classification, and collation of data,

(c) formulation of conclusions on this basis. Descriptions of procedure in (b) carried out by the present Research Worker, are given in Sections 3 and 4.

5. Techniques adopted by the Field Worker, (Mr. E.H. Flint), were those used in the Queensland Speech Survey. Conversations were recorded with the Field Worker absent, with the tape recorder left running and with the full consent of the informants. Twelve groups, each of four informants, ages 6-16, male and female, aboriginal and non-aboriginal, were recorded. The Field Worker selected from the material the speech of four aboriginal boys in the 14-16 age group. The co-operation of one of the aboriginal informants at the Settlement was then enlisted to translate and explain parts of this material. ……………………… 

Keyword English language -- Australia
English language -- Dialects -- Queensland -- Yarrabah Aboriginal Reserve

 
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