Reducing the neural search space for hominid cognition: what distinguishes human and great ape brains from those of small apes?

Butler, David and Suddendorf, Thomas (2014) Reducing the neural search space for hominid cognition: what distinguishes human and great ape brains from those of small apes?. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 21 3: 590-619. doi:10.3758/s13423-013-0559-0


Author Butler, David
Suddendorf, Thomas
Title Reducing the neural search space for hominid cognition: what distinguishes human and great ape brains from those of small apes?
Journal name Psychonomic Bulletin and Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1531-5320
0022-0221
Publication date 2014-06
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3758/s13423-013-0559-0
Open Access Status
Volume 21
Issue 3
Start page 590
End page 619
Total pages 30
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Differences in the psychological capacities of closely related species are likely due to differences in their brains. Here, we review neuroanatomical comparisons between hominids (i.e., great apes and humans) and their closest living relatives, the hylobatids (i.e., small apes). We report the differences in quantitative, as well as qualitative, neural characteristics on the basis of 19 comparative studies that each included representatives of all hominid genera and at least one genus of hylobatid. The current data are patchy, based on a small number of hylobatids and few neuroanatomical features. Yet a systematic interspecies comparison could help reduce the neuroanatomical search space for the neural correlates underlying psychological abilities restricted to hominids. We illustrate the potential power of this approach by discussing the neural features of visual self-recognition.
Keyword Hominids
Hylobatids
Apes
Evolution
Comparative psychology
Comparative neuroanatomy
Visual self-recognition
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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