Laboratory compression of scalped coal mine spoil materials tested under dry and wet conditions

Williams, D. J. and Kho, A. K. (2014). Laboratory compression of scalped coal mine spoil materials tested under dry and wet conditions. In: N. Khalili, A. R. Russell and A. Khoshghalb, Unsaturated Soils: Research and Applications: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Unsaturated Soils: UNSAT 2014. 6th International Conference on Unsaturated Soils (UNSAT 2014), Sydney, Australia, (1551-1557). 2-4 July 2014. doi:10.1201/b17034-227


Author Williams, D. J.
Kho, A. K.
Title of paper Laboratory compression of scalped coal mine spoil materials tested under dry and wet conditions
Conference name 6th International Conference on Unsaturated Soils (UNSAT 2014)
Conference location Sydney, Australia
Conference dates 2-4 July 2014
Proceedings title Unsaturated Soils: Research and Applications: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Unsaturated Soils: UNSAT 2014
Journal name Unsaturated Soils: Research and Applications - Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Unsaturated Soils, UNSAT 2014
Place of Publication Leiden, Netherlands
Publisher CRC Press/Balkema
Publication Year 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1201/b17034-227
Open Access Status
ISBN 9781138026902
9781138001503
9781315749587
Editor N. Khalili
A. R. Russell
A. Khoshghalb
Volume 2
Start page 1551
End page 1557
Total pages 7
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The conventional laboratory compression testing of geo-materials is carried out in a water bath to create near-saturated materials. The aim of this is reduce the materials to two phases: solids and water, which are both essentially incompressible. This makes the results of the testing easier to interpret, since if highly compressible air were present the pore volume, degree of saturation and hence matric suction would change continuously during compression. Testing under saturated conditions will also generally represent a worst case situation, inducing greater compression than testing under unsaturated conditions. In addition, the limited scale of conventional laboratory test apparatus restricts the maximum particle size that can be tested. This necessitates that coarse-grained materials, such as coal mine spoil, be scalped to enable laboratory compression testing. Australian coal mine spoil materials selected to cover a range from essentially uncemented rocks to cemented sandstones, were prepared loose in a 150 mm diameter by 150 mm high, 10 MPa oedometer, and subjected to incremental compression under dry (assampled moisture content) and wet (in a water bath) conditions. The dry state represents the as-dumped condition, while the wet state represents the ultimate wetting-up of the material in the spoil pile due to rainfall infiltration and groundwater inflow. In the dry state, the air in the voids of the specimens is free to compress, leading to an increase in the degree of saturation and a decrease in the matric suction. The initial and final moisture contents and densities of the specimens were recorded. In the paper, the results for uncemented and cemented coal mine spoil materials tested under dry and wet conditions are presented and compared with data from the literature.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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