The influence of system scale on impinging jet sediment erosion: observed using novel and standard measurement techniques

Hunter, Timothy N., Peakall, Jeff, Unsworth, Thomas J., Acun, Mehmet Hakan, Keevil, Gareth, Rice, Hugh and Biggs, Simon (2013) The influence of system scale on impinging jet sediment erosion: observed using novel and standard measurement techniques. Chemical Engineering Research and Design, 91 4: 722-734. doi:10.1016/j.cherd.2013.02.002


Author Hunter, Timothy N.
Peakall, Jeff
Unsworth, Thomas J.
Acun, Mehmet Hakan
Keevil, Gareth
Rice, Hugh
Biggs, Simon
Title The influence of system scale on impinging jet sediment erosion: observed using novel and standard measurement techniques
Journal name Chemical Engineering Research and Design   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0263-8762
1744-3563
Publication date 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.cherd.2013.02.002
Open Access Status
Volume 91
Issue 4
Start page 722
End page 734
Total pages 13
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract Jet impingement as a method for eroding particulate beds and maintaining sediment in suspension is an important process for a host of industries, particularly in nuclear waste processing, where such systems to disperse and mix particulate beds have a number of advantages over other approaches. Existing work has utilised fairly rudimentary techniques for the measurement of erosion depths and here we demonstrate a new technique for measuring both static and dynamic erosion of cohesionless particulates under an impinging jet, using ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry. This approach is tested on both quartz sands and on a range of Mg(OH)2 particulates that are key simulants for nuclear waste facilities, such as the Highly Active Storage Tanks at Sellafield, U.K. A critical jet height was found to exist that balanced the impingement velocities and total entrained jet volume to maximise erosion. The effect of system scale was also considered by normalising steady-state crater depths and sizes, with erosion being enhanced in the small scale, possibly due to increased turbulent recirculation. Additionally, velocity profiles and acoustic backscatter were used to determine both steady-state crater profiles and kinetic changes in bed-depths with time, and highlighted important differences between static and dynamic measurements of erosion depth.
Keyword Cohesionless sediments
Erosion
Impinging jets
Scour
Ultrasonic velocity profiling
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Information Technology Publications
 
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