Advantaged group collective action: The role of legitimacy and in-group support for discrimination

Cubis, Lee (2013). Advantaged group collective action: The role of legitimacy and in-group support for discrimination Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Cubis, Lee
Thesis Title Advantaged group collective action: The role of legitimacy and in-group support for discrimination
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Aarti Iyer
Total pages 92
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary While discrimination is widely considered to have no place in modern society, it is still pervasive and damaging to its victims. Further, there is an inconsistency between antidiscrimination sentiment and the reality of its prevalence. Recent studies indicate that framing discrimination as legitimate and fair, versus illegitimate and unfair influences peoples’ subsequent responses to that discrimination. This has important implications for pro-social or discriminatory action intentions, such as signing a petition to support or oppose the discrimination. The current research extends the legitimate discrimination paradigm by investigating 199 advantaged group members’ (i.e. those who benefit from or who’s group perpetrates the discrimination) responses to the ban on same-sex marriage when it was framed as either legitimate or illegitimate. Group norms have also been implicated as influencing discrimination, but little work on norms and discrimination has focussed on the advantaged group. Responses to group norms reflecting either high or low support for discrimination were compared to a no-message control. As predicted, discrimination framed as illegitimate predicted higher pro-social and lower discriminatory collective action intentions, a process mediated by pro-social emotions (e.g. sympathy). Contrary to predictions, a norm of high in-group support for discrimination increased prosocial collective action intentions, mediated by negativity at the in-group. These findings contribute to the dearth of research on legitimate discrimination, group norms and advantaged group pathways to collective action. Such research may be utilised in designing campaigns to challenge inequality. Future research should extend the legitimate discrimination paradigm with other predictors.
Keyword advantaged group
collective action
ingroup support
discrimination

 
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Created: Fri, 13 Jun 2014, 15:15:41 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology