Money: The counter-intuitive effect of economic gratification on attitudes towards newcomers

Chu, Austin (2013). Money: The counter-intuitive effect of economic gratification on attitudes towards newcomers Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Chu, Austin
Thesis Title Money: The counter-intuitive effect of economic gratification on attitudes towards newcomers
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Jolanda Jetten
Total pages 87
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Research has generally focused on the notion that harsh times, particularly through events such as the Global Financial Crisis, produce harsh attitudes and prejudice towards immigrants. However, one relatively unexplored phenomenon is that prosperous times can also harden attitudes against immigrants. The present study aimed to examine under which conditions economic prosperity can produce harsh attitudes towards newcomers. In a 2 (wealth group: rich vs. poor) x 3 (wealth disparity change: decreasing, increasing vs. no change) experimental design, participants (N = 105) played an investment trading game in which their starting wealth varied to emulate increasing or decreasing wealth disparity between the rich and poor groups over time. The results of the study demonstrate that, regardless of the objective wealth of groups, attitudes and resource allocation towards newcomers are most negative in the context of decreasing intergroup disparity. No significant effects were observed on the measures of collective angst and in-group identification. The theoretical and practical implications of the results are discussed.

 
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Created: Thu, 12 Jun 2014, 14:34:57 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology