Convergent neuroimaging and lesion mapping evidence for the role of the posterior superior temporal sulcus in affective understanding of others

Beavis,Tarran (2013). Convergent neuroimaging and lesion mapping evidence for the role of the posterior superior temporal sulcus in affective understanding of others Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Beavis,Tarran
Thesis Title Convergent neuroimaging and lesion mapping evidence for the role of the posterior superior temporal sulcus in affective understanding of others
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-10-09
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Dr. Pascal Molenberghs
Total pages 97
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Neuroimaging and lesion studies investigating the neural networks involved in understanding the affective mental states of others have highlighted inconsistencies in results. There are two main theories commonly proposed to explain how it is that this is achieved. Simulation Theory, which proposes this is achieved by simulating their emotional expressions (posterior inferior frontal gyrus, pIFG; rostral inferior parietal lobule, rIPL) and Mentalising, which proposes we reason about others’ minds (medial prefrontal cortex, mPFC; posterior superior temporal sulcus, pSTS; temporal poles). Whilst neuroimaging can show areas involved in a task it cannot indicate those that are critical, as can be done with lesion mapping. Therefore, the present study combines functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 20 healthy adult controls and voxel- based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM) in 27 stroke patients. Both groups were presented with the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test requiring attribution of mental states to photographs of the eye region of individuals. The healthy controls also undertook a modified version of this task inside an MRI scanner requiring attributions of mental states or age. As predicted, significant activation was found for the mind versus age contrast in the bilateral pIFG, bilateral rIPL, mPFC, bilateral pSTS, and temporal poles. Stroke patients with damage to the temporal and right parietal lobes showed a deficit on the task and the lesion map in stroke patients overlapped with the mind versus age fMRI activity map in healthy volunteers in the pSTS. The results suggest that both mentalising and simulation theory systems are involved in understanding the affective mind set of others, with particular emphasis on the importance of the pSTS.
Keyword Neuroimaging
lesion studies
temporal sulcus

 
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Created: Tue, 10 Jun 2014, 14:54:16 EST by Danico Jones on behalf of School of Psychology